Tag Archives: Shanghai Metro

The Shanghai Metro is the urban rapid transit system of China’s largest city, Shanghai. The system incorporates both subway and light railway lines. It opened in 1995, making Shanghai the third city in Mainland China, after Beijing and Tianjin, to have a subway. Since then, the Shanghai Metro has become one of the newest and fastest-growing rapid transit systems in the world. Today, there are twelve metro lines (including the Shanghai Maglev Train), 264 stations[note 1] and 420 km of tracks in operation, making it the longest network in the world. Daily ridership averaged 3.56 million in 2009 and set a record of 5.604 million on April 2, 2010.

Line 2, Shanghai Metro

Line 2 forms the west-east axis of the Shanghai metro network, intersecting with the north-south axis Line 1 at People’s Square. With a length of 64 km, it is the longest line in the metro system. Line 2 runs from Xujing East in the west to Pudong International Airport in the east, passing Hongqiao Airport, the Huangpu river, and the Lujiazui financial district in Pudong. It is the only line that serves both airports. The eastern portion of the line, from Guanglan Road to Pudong International Airport, only operates from 9:00am to 4:30pm.

History

  • October 28, 1999 — Zhongshan Park – Longyang Road (16.3 km, 12 stations)
  • December 26, 2000 — Longyang Road – Zhangjiang Hi-Tech Park (2.8 km, 1 station)
  • December 30, 2006 — Zhongshan Park – Songhong Road (6.15 km, 4 stations)
  • February 24, 2010 — Zhangjiang Hi-Tech Park – Guanglan Road (2 new stations and rebuilding of Zhangjiang Hi-Tech Park station)
  • March 16, 2010 — Songhong Road – Xujing East (8 km, 2 stations)
  • April 8, 2010 — Guanglan Road – Pudong International Airport (26.8 km, 8 stations)

In October 2006, it was decided to rename three stations on Line 2 by the end of the year, adopting a new naming scheme: metro stations, unlike bus stops, are no longer supposed to be named after neighbouring vertical streets, but famous streets and sights in the vicinity, making it easier for visitors to find these places. The renamed stations are Century Avenue (formerly Dongfang Road), East Nanjing Road (formerly Middle Henan Road) and West Nanjing Road (formerly Shimen No. 1 Road).

Important Stations

Some important stations on the line are:

  • Hongqiao Airport Terminal 2 – Provides a direct link with the Hongqiao Airport. Interchange with Line 10 in the future.
  • Zhongshan Park – Interchange with Lines 3 and 4. Zhongshan Park, Several major shopping malls, including ‘Metro Town’ and ‘Cloud Nine’.
  • Jing’an Temple – close to famous Jing’an Temple and the terminal for some airport buses, as well as a shopping plaza. Interchange with Line 7.
  • People’s Square – at People’s Square, an important business and shopping area, the station is one of the busiest on the network. Interchange with Lines 1 and 8.
  • Nanjing Road (E.) – on Nanjing Road pedestrianised shopping street, and close to The Bund and the bookstores on Fuzhou Road.
  • Lujiazui – the first stop in Pudong, in the middle of the Lujiazui financial center, close to the Huangpu River, Oriental Pearl Tower and Jinmao Building.
  • Century Avenue – the biggest and currently the only station on the Shanghai Metro to be a 4-line-interchange-station. Passengers can interchange to Lines 4, 6 and 9 at this station.
  • Longyang Road – near the Shanghai New International Exhibition Center and several large stores (Decathlon, Metro, B&Q). Interchange with Line 7; Transfer with the Shanghai Maglev Train to Pudong Airport.
  • Guanglan Road – A tranfer point for 8-carriaged trains (heading west) and 4-carriaged trains (heading east).
  • Pudong International Airport – the eastern terminus of the line. It serves the airport of the same name in Shanghai. Transfer with the Shanghai Maglev Train to Longyang Road.

Power Supply

Siemens Transportation Systems equipped this line with an overhead contact line (cantilever material: galvanized steel) and 7 DC traction power supply substations

Line 1, Shanghai Metro

Line 1 is the main north-south line of the Shanghai Metro and was the first line to open, in 1995. It runs from Fujin Road in the north, via Shanghai Railway Station to Xinzhuang in the south. This line added a very important transport method to the city, making transportation between home and work much more convenient for thousands of people living in Shanghai.

A northern extension running from Fujin Road to Gongfu Xincun was opened on December 29, 2007. This added 3 stations to the metro line.

This line serves many important points in Shanghai, including People’s Square, a major interchange. Due to the large number of important locations served, this line is extremely busy. The daily ridership is over 1,000,000, making it the busiest line of the Shanghai Metro system.

History

  • May 28, 1993 – Xujiahui – Shanghai South Railway Station (formerly known as Xinlonghua)
  • April 10, 1995 – Shanghai Railway Station – Jinjiang Park
  • December 28, 1996 – Separate southern section from Jinjiang Park (formerly known as Hongmei Road South) to Xinzhuang opens. Northern extension continues to operate to Shanghai Railway Station.
  • July 1, 1997 – The northern and southern sections are connected, forming one complete line from Shanghai Railway Station – Xinzhuang.
  • December 28, 2004 – Line runs from Gongfu Xincun – Xinzhuang after northern extension opens.
  • December 29, 2007 – Second northern extension opens; full line runs from Fujin Road – Xinzhuang.

Important stations

  • Shanghai Railway Station – Connects the metro with the main railway station in the city, allowing easy transport to and from other provinces. Virtual Interchange with Lines 3 and 4.
  • People’s Square – This station serves a very important business and shopping area, but is also close to multiple tourist attractions making the station busy all day long. Interchange with Lines 2 and 8.
  • Xujiahui – This is an important business and commercial area, also with tourist attractions such as the Xujiahui Cathedral. Virtual Interchange with Line 9.
  • Shanghai Indoor Stadium – This station is located at the sports stadium of the same name and the biggest regional and long distance bus station in the city. Interchange with Line 4.
  • Shanghai South Railway Station – This station serves the second railway station of the city, which mostly accommodates trains serving cities mainly to the south. Interchange with Line 3.
  • Xinzhuang – The southern terminus of Line 1; interchange with Line 5.
Statistics
Type Rapid transit
Status Extension to Chongming Island in planning
Locale Shanghai, China
Termini Fujin Road
Xinzhuang
No. of stations 28
Operation
Opened April 10, 1995
Operator(s) Shanghai No.1 Metro Operation Co. Ltd.
Character Underground and elevated
Technical
Line length 36.39 km (22.61 mi)
No. of tracks 2
Gauge 1,435 mm (4 ft 8+12 in)
Electrification Overhead lines (1500 volts)
Operating speed 80 km/h (50 mph)

Shanghai Metro

The Shanghai Metro is the urban rapid transit system of China’s largest city, Shanghai. The system incorporates both subway (地铁) and light railway (轻轨) lines. It opened in 1995, making Shanghai the third city in Mainland China, after Beijing and Tianjin, to have a subway. Since then, the Shanghai Metro has become one of the newest and fastest-growing rapid transit systems in the world. Today, there are twelve metro lines (excluding the Shanghai Maglev Train), 268 stations and over 420 km of tracks in operation, making it the longest network in the world.Daily ridership averaged 3.56 million in 2009 and set a record of 6.013 million on May 21, 2010.

In the six months leading up to the opening of Expo 2010 on May 1, 2010, the Shanghai Metro has undergone major expansion:

  • Line 2, with separate sections opening on February 24, March 16, and April 8, 2010, is now over 63 km in total length and connects both of the city’s airports — Hongqiao and Pudong.
  • Line 7 opened on December 5, 2009
  • Line 9′s Yishan Road to Century Avenue section opened on Dec. 31, 2009, followed by the extension to Middle Yanggao Road on April 7, 2010.
  • Line 10 opened on April 10, 2010.
  • Line 11 opened on December 31, 2009 and the Anting Branch followed on March 29, 2010.
  • Line 13 opened on April 20, 2010.

The system is still growing, more new lines and extensions are under construction, and plans through 2020 project a system comprising 22 lines and 877 km of length.

The fast-growing Shanghai Metro network has 12 lines with another 7 under construction (and expansions to existing lines), with nearly all lines operating underground (Line 3 operates above ground). The Metro is fast, cheap, air conditioned and fairly user-friendly with most signs and station arrival announcements in English, but the trains can get packed during rush hour. Fares range from ¥3-9 depending on distance. Automatic ticket vending machines take ¥1 or ¥0.5 coins and notes and have services in English. Most stations on lines 1-3 will also have staff selling tickets, but on the newly-completed lines 6, 8, and 9 ticket purchasing is all done by machine (in both Chinese and English) with staff there only to assist in adding credit to cards or if something goes wrong. You can now transfer between lines freely with a single ticket (except at Shanghai Railway Station, Hongkou Football Stadium, and Yishan Lu where a subway pass/Shanghai public transportation card is required for transfer). Metro rides can be paid for using use Shanghai’s public transportation card (non-contact). Be careful; certain stations exist on two different lines with the same name but are located in different places (Yishan Lu- Line 3/9 and line 4 are separate stations- transfer between these stations is only possible with a subway pass; Pudian Lu- line 4 and line 6; go to either Century Ave or Lancun Lu to transfer between these lines; Hongkou Football Stadium, Line 3 and 8- transfer is only possible with a Metro pass).

If there are seats available but more passengers boarding than seats, be prepared to see a mad dash (literally) as passengers wrestle for the available seats. This is the norm so move quickly if you want a seat. Be mindful of pickpockets who may use this rush to their advantage.

Lines and Stations

Lines

Line Terminals Opened Newest
Extension
Length
(km)
Stations Interchange
1 Fujin Road Xinzhuang 1995 2007 36.4 28 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10
2 Xujing East Pudong International Airport 1999 2010 63.8 29 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, Maglev
3 North Jiangyang Road Shanghai South Railway Station 2000 2006 40.3 29 1, 2, 4, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
4 Loop line beginning at Yishan Road 2005 2007 33.7 26 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
5 Xinzhuang Minhang Development Zone 2003 - 17.2 11 1
6 Gangcheng Road South Lingyan Road 2007 - 31.1 27 2, 4, 7, 8, 9
7 Shanghai University Huamu Road 2009 - 34.4 27 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 9, Maglev
8 Shiguang Road Aerospace Museum 2007 2009 37.4 28 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10
9 Songjiang Xincheng Middle Yanggao Road 2007 2010 45.2 23 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 13
10 New Jiangwan Town Hangzhong Road 2010 - 29.6 27 1, 2, 3, 4, 8
11 Jiading North/Anting Jiangsu Road 2009 2010 45.8 19 2, 3, 4
13 Madang Road Shibo Avenue 2010 - 4.0 3 9
Maglev Longyang Road Pudong International Airport 2002 - 33.0 2 2, 7
Total: 428.7 268